A “Lost” Chapter Found…

Very happy to report that my story The “Lost” Chapter of John Jourdain will appear in the upcoming Fall issue of Conjunctions.

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Izhar Patkin’s Poetic Enchantments

Over at Artnet, I take a look at Izhar Patkin’s glittering show at Mass MoCA. Read it, see ie. Click the image.

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Narrative, performance, the self and its creations, are seen in constant and ever-shifting flux. To look for answers here, Patkin suggests, is a fool’s errand, but to ask questions, and to continue asking them, though not a path to redemption, can lead to ever more refined ideas about the possibilities of being.


Reading at Bowery Arts on June 1st

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Join Quintan Ana Wikswo, Matthew Sharpe, and Ranbir Singh Sidhu as they bring new work to the stage for an evening of morphological misadventure within the uncanny nooks and crannies of newly invoked worlds.

$10 at the door; advance tickets online here: http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/702551

QUINTAN ANA WIKSWO (www.QuintanWikswo.com) is recognized for projects that integrate her original literature, visual art, video, and performance works. Her collection of short stories and photographs – The Hope Of Floating Has Carried Us This Far – is forthcoming on Coffee House Press. Her fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and theory appears in anthologies, fine art catalogues, artist’s books, and in magazines including Tin House, Gulf Coast, Conjunctions, The Kenyon Review, New American Writing, Golden Handcuffs Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, and many more. Her works are exhibited, published, and performed at prominent institutions through Europe and the Americas, including three solo exhibitions at major museums in New York City and Berlin, and performances at (Le) Poisson Rouge, St. Mark’s Church, Incubator Arts Project, Dixon Place, Beyond Baroque, and others. She is the recipient of fellowships from Creative Capital, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Pollock Krasner Foundation, Center for Cultural Innovation, Theo Westenberger Estate, Yaddo, and more. She maintains a lively visiting artist practice at NYU, CUNY, Colgate College, California College of Arts, California State University, and others.

MATTHEW SHARPE (http://sharpestories.blogspot.com) is the author of the novels You Were Wrong, Jamestown, The Sleeping Father, and Nothing Is Terrible. He is the recipient of fellowships from the National Endowment of the Arts and the New York Foundation for the Arts. He teaches in the graduate writing program at Columbia University, and has been posting a one-page story every week to his blog Very Short Stories R Us.

RANBIR SINGH SIDHU (www.ranbirsidhu.com) is the author of Good Indian Girls, and a winner of the Pushcart Prize in Fiction and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship, and other awards. His stories appear in The Georgia Review, Fence, Zyzzyva, The Missouri Review, Other Voices, The Literary Review, Alaska Quarterly Review, The Barcelona Review, The Happy Hypocrite and other journals and anthologies. His work for theater has been supported by MCC Theater, the Edward F. Albee Foundation, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, La Mama ETC, the September 11th Fund, and the New York State Council for the Arts among others.

 


A conversation with Quintan Ana Wikswo

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Over at the Degenerate Art Ensemble, Quintan Ana Wikswo and I talk about hellhounds, death, toast, TS Eliot, talismans, and jam. Check it out here.


Remembering Agha Shahid Ali

Over at The Aerogram, I write about Agha Shahid Ali, and his collaboration at the end of his life with the important Israeli-American artists Izhar Patkin. Find it here.

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A Tribute to Agha Shahid Ali

For those in western Mass on Thursday, April 24, I’ll be reading in a very special tribute to the late poet Agha Shahid Ali at Mass MoCA, in North Adams. It’s organized around the mid-career retrospective of the artist Izhar Patkin. Details here.

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News On Sunday names GIG Book To Remember 2013

Screen Shot 2014-03-17 at 7.19.07 PMAnd Moazzam Sheikh writes: “Ranbir Sidhu’s stories in Good Indian Girls were brilliant. Sidhu’s main concern is disintegration of humanity. He can take a story where many won’t go. The title story is a remarkable example of his control over the pace of the narrative.”


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