The Ghosts of Omonia Square

This just up at The Margins, with photos, one last dispatch from Athens, this time with hookers, junkies, immigrants, and cops.

At night, the junkies take over the square. They are almost vaporously thin, like the dead even before they shoot up. They have ruined most of their veins and bend forward to stick the needle in the backs of their knees or other parts of their legs. The happy ones are curled up fetally, oblivious to everything. A tall South Asian man with a tense, fierce face asks me several nights in a row if I want anything. “Hash? Junk? Anything?”

Read the whole story here.


Protected: The City Painted, part two

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Protected: Night Walks in Athens

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More than lives lost in Oak Park

In the current issue of Open Magazine, I have a more personal response to the killings in Oak Park, Wisconsin.

Beyond the lives tragically lost, it is the attack on this institution that I feel most deeply, for the gurdwara is not only a place of worship and service, but also one of real community and, for the children, of uninhibited play where the demands of parents are relaxed and the spectre of bullies a distant threat.

Read the full story here.


Protected: The City Painted, part one

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On the Oak Park shootings

I didn’t write the headline on the published piece, and nor is that what I say. And the paragraph breaks on the online version are a mess. Not mine for sure.

As a Sikh, as an American, the latest, the murder of five Sikhs and a police officer at a gurudwara in Oak Creek, Wisconsin, hits home for me, and home hard.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-2184531/Political-culture-blame-mass-shootings-guns.html#ixzz22oBmDcmi


Switch off the Bhangra

Switch off the Bhangra

In Punjab these days, the almost universal ubiquity of bhangra is creating a deadening musical monoculture, and it’s a monoculture that’s a broad reflection of the state of Punjabi culture as a whole.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/indiahome/indianews/article-2183293/Switch-bhangra.html#ixzz22a111SQ8


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