BOOKS

GOOD INDIAN GIRLS

“Achingly merciless, London-born author Sidhu’s 12 short stories sharply delineate the edges of identity and sanity… These haunting tales simultaneously attract and repel, enchant and shatter, evoking the ambiguous relationships between past and present, others and self… Deftly sifting through a range of less-often-visited emotions, Sidhu creates inscrutable characters inhabiting bewildering circumstances… Smart, provocative and poignantly disturbing, this collection, the author’s U.S. debut, signals a writer to watch.”

Kirkus Reviews (Starred Review)

“These stories are beautiful, complex, unpleasant, dark, tough-minded and often quite funny in their evocation of the absurdity of our global cultural salad… The destruction and reversal of everything—culture, history, convention—is Sidhu’s extremely powerful starting point for an immigrant narrative. [Sidhu] systematically undermines the concept of a coherent Indian emigre identity. These are Indians who have never lived in India, who don’t know how to put on a sari, and who wouldn’t go back if they could. Their India has burned.”

Tottenville Review

 

 

51rauPfzN-L

Available from these booksellers

Amazon

McNally Jackson

Powell’s

Barnes & Noble

In twelve startling and vividly imagined stories, Ranbir Singh Sidhu overturns the lives of ordinary Indians living in America to bring us a bold debut collection, Good Indian Girls.

A woman attends a de-cluttering class in search of love. A low-level, drunkard diplomat finds himself mysteriously transferred to the Consulate in San Francisco, where everyone believes he is a great, lost poet. An anthropological expedition searching for early human fossils goes disastrously wrong and the leader turns to searching for the very first sounds made by humans. The wife of a retiring Consul pays tribute to her pet python by preparing to serve him to her dinner guests. The discovery of a skull outside an orphanage leads to the creation of a cult around one of the charismatic young residents.

Unsettling, moving, insightful, humorous — these beautifully written stories travel between despair and redemption as they illuminate the lives of often deeply flawed characters. This collection marks the emergence of a major new voice in American fiction.

“In twelve vivid stories, Ranbir Singh Sidhu paints tender, uproarious and incredibly insightful portraits of Indians living in America.”

Barnes & Noble Review

“Though weird and eccentric, Sidhu’s stories are also empathetic and refreshingly free of the clichés of immigrant narratives. He manages to portray his characters as uniquely Indian without losing sight of their individuality, offering small, piercing looks into the humanity that resides in every situation and person, no matter how strange.”

Publishers Weekly

“With adeptly drawn characters, Sidhu demonstrates a dexterous grasp of the human psyche, while the prevalence of dark twists displays his love of the fatalistic. This propensity for the morose will be off-putting for some but is sure to please those with a taste for black humor and shades of the diabolical.”

Booklist

“In Good Indian Girls, Sidhu aims to provoke, taking on issues of identity in the South Asian diaspora, featuring characters who are often deeply conflicted and in situations that are neither comforting nor cliché.”

The Aerogram

“Border Song, among the lightest pieces in this collection, finds the transformative grace in grief and a closure of sorts that eludes characters in The Order of Things, a masterpiece of a story that could have you marvelling at Sidhu’s incisive and distinctive perspective for the Punjab experience of violence, exile and estrangement—both within India and abroad.”

Shalini Mukerjee, Outlook India

“Ranbir Sidhu is imaginative, with a dry, sly wit, very intelligent, and owns a wicked sensibility, all of which makes his fiction smart, daring, sensitive to human perversity, and keen in its observations. He is one of the most compelling and sophisticated younger writers today; and his writing is beautiful and entertaining.”

Lynne Tillman, author of American Genius A Comedy, and No Lease On Life

“When I first met Ranbir Sidhu, he was a resident at the Edward F. Albee Foundation in Montauk and while there, he displayed tremendous talent and dedication. His work takes risks, is often daring and imaginative, and I appreciate the intelligence he brings to his craft. I look forward to reading his new collection of stories, Good Indian Girls.”

Edward Albee, author of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

“Whenever I pick up a story by Ranbir Sidhu, I feel as though I’ve been released from the cedarwood closet of literature into the fresh air of active creation; as though I’d been fitted with brand-new high-tech earphones picking up an infinity of eloquent microphones cleverly scattered around the world. The pops and squeaks of new life crackle in my ears, and even when they’re threatening or saddening, I’m inevitably overcome by the hope that they’ll never stop.”

Harry Mathews, author of My Life in CIA, Cigarettes and The Journalist

“The first-person narrator of ‘The Good Poet of Africa’ despises poetry, repays compassion with insult, and enjoys lying to children. but, by story’s end, the moral universe will be turned on its head, and the reader will empathize with Ranbir Sidhu’s loathsome protagonist. This is writing of uncommon assurance and skill.”

Jeet Thayil, author of Narcopolis

“Ranbir Sidhu’s stories in Good Indian Girls were brilliant. Sidhu’s main concern is disintegration of humanity. He can take a story where many won’t go. The title story is a remarkable example of his control over the pace of the narrative.”

Moazzam Sheikh, News on Sunday

“Dysfunctional relationships, malfunctioning humans, stoned kitchen slick talk, psycho Bombay coolie madness, sex toy swashbuckling and subversive black operations based in NYC. I’m constantly delighted by Ranbir’s work! He is one of the great displaced Cali to Delhi via London, Brooklyn leather jacket rebels pushing the line. Armed with an instinct for the ironic and wicked intentions, Ranbir’s world is totally cool.”

Tanuj Chopra, writer/director, Punching At The Sun, official selection at the Sundance and Tribeca film festivals

“Stories out of the box fill up Sidhu`s anthology of short stories that craft extraordinary tales out of ordinary realities. It is a treat.”

Indo-Asian News Service

Fall 2012 (Harper Collins India)

Good Indian Girls-cover


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 111 other followers